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Ukraine's Time

"Pora": a direct source for information on the current struggle in Ukraine.
The current struggle in Ukraine is the latest in hundreds & hundreds of years of struggle, usually against interference, ambitions, lies, invasions, by other peoples. Seldom has Ukraine been left alone. Not the USA, nor Russia, nor the European Union are to be trusted in this new attempt to tear the nation apart for its resources. I wish i could be in Kyiv right now, with the tens & hundreds of thousands protesting for freedom, justice, & peace. I've been there; these are my people. I want to share a website, of a group called "Pora" /poRAH/, meaning "Time" or "Season". The site is fairly like Indymedia, run largely by university students, from Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kyiv Shevchenko National University, & so on, plus other people of all ages & stations. There are pictures, too, from the front lines. The protests could be in Portland USA, against the similar corruptions & injustices here. The struggle is the same, everywhere, & must not stop! See you at the barricades.

 http://pora.org.ua/en/

"Mir Ukraiini!" "Peace to Ukraine!"
Progressives need analysis needed 29.Nov.2004 08:32

not just emotive reactions

Questions...questions...questions...

1. Who is financing this "protest"?
2. Who screamed "fraud" first? Yushchenko?(Was he not working with Kuchma- the privatization man?)
3. Why is Poland sending its reactionaries to the Ukraine to foment the protest?
4. Why is Havel- that phony bourgeois "poet" there also?
5. What has not yet been privatized? Why are the miners opposing the protest?
6. Who benefits most from a divided Ukraine?
7. What is the position of the Ukrainian Left at this point in time?
8. What US corporations are present there?
9. *****Why is this "freedom"nationalist movement not opposing the occupation of Iraq. Why is the Ukraine hypocritical here: helping the occupiers of other sovereign states????
10. Why are the Pope and the Grand Orthodox Patriarch kissing passionately now?

Is it not true that emotional people are often blinded by cool collected Power.

Iraq 29.Nov.2004 10:59

LT

Yushchenko wants Ukrainian troop out of Iraq

I’m not sure you want to associate yourself with these people. 29.Nov.2004 14:43

Red neck

These people or should I say the people who manipulate these people are our worst enemy.

"The site is fairly like Indymedia, run largely by university students, from Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kyiv Shevchenko National University, & so on, plus other people of all ages & stations. There are pictures, too, from the front lines. The protests could be in Portland USA, against the similar corruptions & injustices here. The struggle is the same, everywhere, & must not stop!"

That's why they're so dangerous, They imitate our tactics then use them against us. They have directed their energy this year at us in the US, applying very similar tactics that they using in Eastern Europe. MoveON.org, Rock the Vote, PunkVoter, etc. Using clichés and hysteria trying to co-opt this movement. Preying on the young, the naive, the idealistic, the frightened, the confused.
 http://www.popandpolitics.com/articles_detail.cfm?articleID=1331
Ukraine has been through every horror that the twentieth century had to offer.
For people to even think of risking another disaster is too insane to believe, especially over an election squabble between two gangsters. What Ukrainians need to do is wake up to the fact that there country has been completely wrecked by its capitulation to capitalism. For over a decade they have watched their economy, infrastructure, society, and health crumble. They need to come to their senses and realize that socialism with all its failings and mistakes (yes, even disasters) was vastly superior to this debacle. They need to remember that progress even under the worst circumstances is possible. Look what the Communist accomplished in the same time frame (1945-1960) after the almost total destruction of the Ukraine. Progress is even more possible and less difficult today. If we stop falling for rhetoric and spectacle.

The Guardian articles are right on target.
"we are told that a 96% turnout in Donetsk, the home town of Viktor Yanukovich, is proof of electoral fraud. But apparently turnouts of over 80% in areas which support Viktor Yushchenko are not. Nor are actual scores for Yushchenko of well over 90%"

"Plunging into the crowd of Yushchenko supporters in Independence Square after the first round of the election, I met two members of Una-Unso, a neo-Nazi party whose emblem is a swastika. They were unembarrassed about their allegiance, perhaps because last year Yushchenko and his allies stood up for the "Socialist party" newspaper, Silski Visti, after it ran an anti-semitic article claiming that Jews had invaded Ukraine alongside the Wehrmacht in 1941. On September 19 2004, Yushchenko's ally, Alexander Moroz, told JTA-Global Jewish News: "I have defended Silski Visti and will continue to do so. I personally think the argument ... citing 400,000 Jews in the SS is incorrect, but I am not in a position to know all the facts." Yushchenko, Moroz and their oligarch ally, Yulia Tymoshenko, meanwhile, cited a court order closing the paper as evidence of the government's desire to muzzle the media. In any other country, support for anti-semites would be shocking; in this case, our media do not even mention it."

"we are told that a 96% turnout in Donetsk, the home town of Viktor Yanukovich, is proof of electoral fraud. But apparently turnouts of over 80% in areas which support Viktor Yushchenko are not. Nor are actual scores for Yushchenko of well over 90%"

"Plunging into the crowd of Yushchenko supporters in Independence Square after the first round of the election, I met two members of Una-Unso, a neo-Nazi party whose emblem is a swastika. They were unembarrassed about their allegiance, perhaps because last year Yushchenko and his allies stood up for the "Socialist party" newspaper, Silski Visti, after it ran an anti-semitic article claiming that Jews had invaded Ukraine alongside the Wehrmacht in 1941. On September 19 2004, Yushchenko's ally, Alexander Moroz, told JTA-Global Jewish News: "I have defended Silski Visti and will continue to do so. I personally think the argument ... citing 400,000 Jews in the SS is incorrect, but I am not in a position to know all the facts." Yushchenko, Moroz and their oligarch ally, Yulia Tymoshenko, meanwhile, cited a court order closing the paper as evidence of the government's desire to muzzle the media. In any other country, support for anti-semites would be shocking; in this case, our media do not even mention it."

"Whether it is Albania in 1997, Serbia in 2000, Georgia last November or Ukraine now, our media regularly peddle the same fairy tale about how youthful demonstrators manage to bring down an authoritarian regime, simply by attending a rock concert in a central square. Two million anti-war demonstrators can stream though the streets of London and be politically ignored, but a few tens of thousands in central Kiev are proclaimed to be "the people","
Let's not forget the Poodle biting the BBC for its indulgent coverage of the street rabble.
 http://www.guardian.co.uk/ukraine/story/0,15569,1360951,00.html

Let's not get bogged down comparing apples with sour grapes. What we need to be focusing on is this next stage in Western colonization of Eastern Europe. What I'm reading, Romania is unfolding as the next scenario.
I would like to thank the people who posted the Guardian items.
I didn't know about the Guardian articles when I posted my stuff. I've been following CIA/Soros operations in Eastern Europe for over a decade. I had sort of given up on the Guardian a while back. It's heartening to know they have grown back some of their teeth or at least got some implants (us).
Please don't tell me that Havel has flown in from Portugal (No longer lives in 'Czech Republic')with Dagmar(bimbo wife). Predictable!

If anyone thinks I'm anti-Ukrainian, pro-Russain, I would like to state that my wife is 1/8 Ukrainian, the rest is Czech. I'm giving away too much personal information, someone might recognize me.....

USA support for Yanukovich 29.Nov.2004 14:44

zz

Yanukovich Campaign
Yanukovich has hired DBC, a PR firm headed by an ex-Washington lobbyist, to spam journalists on his behalf.

Sorry about the double pasting 29.Nov.2004 15:03

Red neck

of the Guardian article, I wish they would make that screen larger!!!!
"Yanukovich has hired DBC, a PR firm headed by an ex-Washington lobbyist, to spam journalists on his behalf." Everybody tries that tactic, there's plenty of whores in Washington ....ZZZZ

Dear Mr. Red Neck 30.Nov.2004 15:50

lp

You are such a bsing ass.

Ukraine's Jewish community wonders: Is Viktor Yushchenko good for the Jews? 30.Nov.2004 16:21

HAARETZ

CAREFUL WHAT YOU WRITE MR. RED NECK. PLEASE STOP LABALING ALL PEOPLES.
Ukraine's Jewish community wonders: Is Viktor Yushchenko good for the Jews?

By Lily Galili

The 100,000 Jews living in Ukraine lack any real impact on election results in a country with 50 million inhabitants. But like other places in the world, Jewish strength is not measured in numbers only, but in terms of its economic and political power. At present, there are 15 Jewish representatives in the Ukrainian parliament, a number much greater than their proportion in the population, and Jewish tycoons can be found in the political camps of both challenger Viktor Yushchenko and Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich.






According to sources following the election in Ukraine, most Jews supported the liberal Yushchenko, because of his links to the West, but also out of concern that the reelection of Yanukovich, with his ties to Russia, would force isolation on Ukraine and nudge it closer to the Arab world. However, Yushchenko's Jewish supporters are not without concerns over the strengthening of the Ukrainian nationalist elements in his party, which they believe could bring about an increase in anti-Semitism in the country.

"The present government, with its ties to Russia, is good for the Jews," said one Jewish activist in western Ukraine who asked to remain anonymous. "There were only short periods of independence in Ukraine. Objectively speaking, the struggle here now can be seen in a positive light as the beginning of the flourishing of a civil society. But from the Jewish perspective, I'm not sure it's good. The freedom heralded by Yushchenko's party strengthens nationalist elements around him. So far in western Ukraine [where most of whose residents supported Yushchenko], there have been fewer anti-Semitic incidents than in Western Europe. Here and there, swastikas were painted, sometimes tombstones were smashed. The present government is fighting this. So there is fear of change."

This attitude trickled down to an article published last week in the British daily The Guardian, which noted Yushchenko's ambivalent position on closing down an opposition paper after it published a stinging anti-Semitic article. The article in Selskie Vesti ("Village News"), stated that Jews had joined the German army in invading Ukraine. Senior Ukrainian officials, among them Yanukovich, called for the closing of the paper.

Yushchenko, however, wavered in his response. In the midst of the election campaign, the most widely read opposition paper, which had supported him, was too important to give up easily. Only after initial confusion did Yushchenko criticize the article and join the call to shut down the paper.

"I am convinced the article was commissioned to blacken the name of Yushchenko and sabotage a source of support for him," said Leonid Finberg, director of the Judaica Institute in Kiev and chairman of a publishing house. "Presenting him as a person who supports anti-Semitism is a terrible distortion. His father was in Auschwitz, and it is known that his family saved Jews during the Holocaust. The Ukrainian intelligensia, including the Jews, supports him completely. He had made a great contribution to constructive dialogue between the Jewish and the Ukrainian intelligensia."

Finberg also told of the strong position Yushchenko took at a conference on anti-Semitism in Sweden and about an appearance he made before a group of Ukrainian Jews.

Finberg attached little importance to graffiti calling to strike at Jews and Russians that was painted on the walls of clubs associated with Yushchenko, "There are nationalist and anti-Semitic elements on the fringes of all political personalities here. I have no doubt that Yushchenko and his people are not connected to this. Such graffiti can be found today all over the world, including Israel."

The head of the Ukrainian Jewish community, Yosef Zisles, rejected what he called "absurd rumors" connecting Yushchenko to anti-Semitism.

Collecting Donations to Support the Orange Revolution 30.Nov.2004 16:40

jl

29-11-2004 00:37 Maidan-INFORM
Ukrainian Jewish Community is Collecting Donations to Support the Orange Revolution

Print version // Edit // Delete // URL:  http://maidan.org.ua/static/enews/1101681430.html

The Ukrainian Jewish community is collecting donations to support the orange revolution

The Central Kyiv Synagogue is collecting donations to support the protestors. A statement from the Jewish community notes that the people of Ukraine have the right to protest against lawlessness.

False Spin in Ukraine 30.Nov.2004 17:28

cs

One unfortunate outcome of Ukraine's disputed presidential election is that it has brought into stark relief an east-west divide within that large country.Pulled by Western Europe on one side and Russia on the other, and differentiated by language, culture, religion and economics, Ukraine appears to be threatened by breakup. Tuesday the parliament considered the issue of division as governors and officials from pro-Moscow eastern regions pushed for autonomy.

The split is serious, but it's also been exaggerated, and exacerbated, by a critical factor: the Ukrainian media.

All three national television channels have shown heavy bias toward presidential candidate and autocratic Prime Minister Viktor Yanukovich, whose base is in the industrial heartland of the Russian-speaking east. And Russian TV, widely viewed in Ukraine, also swung behind the Moscow-backed Yanukovich.

During the campaign, the pro-Yanukovich media ignored opposition candidate Viktor Yushchenko, or vilified him. The demonization was so severe that many Ukrainians might understandably fear their very way of life would end if Mr. Yushchenko - a Western-leaning democrat backed by hundreds of thousands of determined protesters - succeeds in overturning this clearly rigged election.
The media set up Yushchenko as a fascist who gladhands voters and kisses babies just as Adolf Hitler did. In fact, Yushchenko's father survived Auschwitz. The media portrayed Yushchenko as a CIA lackey; actually, he wants Ukraine's troops out of Iraq.
The opposition candidate was tarred as an anti-Russian nationalist, reflecting the views of extreme western, Catholic Ukrainians who want to suppress the Russian language and who oppose Orthodoxism. Hmmm. Yushchenko was born in northeastern Ukraine, and is Orthodox Christian, like many easterners. When he was prime minister from 1991-2001, he facilitated Russian investment in Ukraine. He promises he will "never force" a language choice on anyone.
The democracy that Yushchenko demands would bring a free media. That wouldn't close the split, but clearing out the lies would go a long way toward uniting the country

The Gaurdian 30.Nov.2004 17:59

xx

PR man to Europe's nastiest regimes

David Aaronovitch
Tuesday November 30, 2004
The Guardian

Whenever, as this past week, eastern Europe is on the news, so too is a man called John Laughland. Last Sunday he was playing Ukrainian expert on the BBC's The World This Weekend, the day before he was here in the Guardian defending the Ukrainian election "result", and at the beginning of the month he was writing for the Spectator - also on Ukraine.

Laughland's great strength is that he sees what no one else in the west seems to. Where reporters in Kiev, including the Guardian's own Nick Paton-Walsh, encounter a genuine democracy movement, Laughland comes across "neo-Nazis" (Guardian), or "druggy skinheads from Lvov" (Spectator). And where most observers report serious and specific instances of electoral fraud and malpractice on the part of the supporters of the current prime minister, Laughland complains only of a systematic bias against (the presumably innocent) Mr Yanukovich.

A quick trawl establishes this to be the Laughland pattern over the past few years and concerning several countries. Laughland has variously queried the idea that human rights are a problem in Belarus, or that the Serbs behaved so very savagely in Kosovo. He has defended Slobodan Milosevic, criticised the International Tribunal in the Hague and generally argued that the problem in countries normally associated with human rights abuses is, in fact, the intervention of western agencies.

It was the British Helsinki Human Rights Group hat that he was wearing last Sunday. On its website the BHHRG - of which Laughland is a trustee - describes itself as a non-governmental organisation which monitors human rights in the 57 member states of the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe. Laughland is listed as a trustee, the historian Mark Almond (to be found writing about the Ukraine in last week's New Statesman) is its chairman.

Founded in 1992, the BHHRG sends observers to elections and writes reports which - along Laughlandish lines - almost invariably dispute the accounts given by better known human rights organisations. This stance has led to the BHHRG being criticised by the International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights (established in 1976) as preferring "the role [is to take] PR flak for a new breed of authoritarian rulers in Europe" to the business of actually monitoring abuses.

So what on earth is going on here? I know nothing about BHHRG's finances, but the ideological trail is fascinating. Take the co-founder of the group, Christine Stone. She was a lawyer before she helped set up BHHRG. Since then she has "written for a number of publications including the Spectator and Wall Street Journal on eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union".

This information comes from a US website called Antiwar.com where, for a while, Stone had a regular Thursday column. But Antiwar.com was not a leftwing site opposing the Iraq war. It was a rightwing site set up to oppose the Kosovo intervention in 1999. Its "editorial director" was a man called Justin Raimondo who was active in the small US Libertarian party before joining the Republican party. In the 1992, 1996 and 2000 elections he supported the campaigns of Pat Buchanan, the far-right isolationist candidate.

Raimondo is also an "adjunct scholar" with the Ludwig von Mises Institute. This is a libertarian think-tank in Auburn, Alabama, founded by one Lew Rockwell, who describes himself as "an opponent of the central state, its wars and its socialism". A contributor to Rockwell's own site is Daniel McAdams, who is - in his own words "honoured to be associated" with the British Helsinki Human Rights Group.

Trail 2. Laughland is also European Director of the European Foundation (patron, Mrs M Thatcher), which - judging by its website - seems to spend most of its time and energy sending out pamphlets by arch-Europhobe Bill Cash. A synopsis of one of Laughland's own books, however, notes his argument that, "Post-national structures ... and supranational organisations such as the European Union - are ... corrosive of liberal values (and) the author shows the ideology as a crucial core of Nazi economic and political thinking."

Beginning to get the picture now? Trail 3 leads us to Sanders Research Associates, a "risk consultancy" for which Laughland is, according to their website, "a regular contributor" and to which companies can subscribe for information and advice. The "principal" is a Chris Sanders. The kind of steer Sanders gives his customers can be adduced from this report on the morning of the US presidential election. "We will be very surprised," he wrote, "if on Wednesday John Kerry has not won a clear majority of electoral college votes and that his supporters are not nursing substantial post vote celebration hangovers, if not still drinking the champagne."

Lots of people got that one wrong, and some blamed their own judgment. Not Sanders. "Our bet," he says following the results, "is that we will soon be adding an investigation into the biggest vote fraud in history.'"

Sanders, it seems, is not beyond the odd bit of conspiracising. In a bulletin from June 2002 he also has something to suggest about the Twin Towers atrocity. "It was obvious then, and it is obvious now," he writes, "that something besides the brilliance of a band of terrorists or the incompetence of America's security apparatus was responsible for the disaster of 9/11." But he doesn't tell us what that "something" was.

Sanders on America and Laughland on Ukraine, however, are not the most amazing features of Sanders Research Associates. That distinction belongs to the report on Rwanda written for Sanders by a Canadian lawyer named Chris Black. Black is the only person I have ever seen putting the word genocide in quotation marks when applied to Rwanda. Rwanda, you see, was all the US's fault, and wasn't carried out by Hutus in any case. It was all got up to justify US intervention in the region. He condemns the "demonising (of) the Hutu leadership".

Since 2000 Black has been the lead counsel representing General Augustin Ndindiliyimana, chief of staff of the Rwandan gendarmerie, at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. He is also chair of the legal committee for the international committee for the defence of Slobodan Milosevic. Last year (though not for Sanders) Black went on a delegation to North Korea. The report he wrote on his return is full of references to happy peasants, committed soldiers and delightful guides. The North Korean system, he suggested, being "participatory", was in many ways more democratic than parliamentary systems in the west.

This is weird company. And what we seem to have in Laughland and his associates is a group of right-wing anti-state libertarians and isolationists, suspicious of any foreign entanglements, who have somehow morphed into apologists for the worst regimes and most appalling dictators on the planet.

And where does it all end up? A couple of weeks ago Sanders commended to his clients "John Laughland's series of articles [showing that] the attack on Iraq is just the southern offensive of a larger campaign to tighten the noose on Russia." And he continued, "What is less well understood are the risks that the unravelling political compact in Israel poses for the United States and Great Britain, whose political processes, intelligence services, military, media and financial establishments are so thoroughly enmeshed with Israel's."

Read that last sentence again and then ask yourself: in what way are Britain's media and financial interests "thoroughly enmeshed" with Israel's?

Why are you not protesting this? 30.Nov.2004 20:54

Red neck

I think I talking to a real Ukrainian.
The World Bank's own statistics.
Before Capitalism and after.
Kakwani, Nanak / Policy Research Working Papers, World Bank , 1995
"The standard of living in Ukraine increased significantly in the 1980s, and income inequality declined. But in 1991-92 income inequality and poverty increased again, partly because government benefits went more to richer families than to those in need."

You can see how dramatically poverty increased after only one year of capitalism!
"The standard of living increased significantly in the late 1980s, then fell in the 1990s. Real per capita family income grew by an average 7 percent in 1989-90, then fell about 24 percent in 1991-92. Per capita income for families dependent on government transfers fell by more than one half. Income inequality declined in the 1980s, to rise again in 1991-92. In particular, the family incomes of state and collective farm workers relative to industrial workers --- improved between 1980 and 1991. The increase in inequality that occurred in 1991-92 came about, among other reasons, because government benefits tended to be redistributed to richer families, not those in need.
Poverty in Ukraine declined over the period 1980-91, from 38 percent of the population to 9 percent. But in 1992, 30 percent of the population was poor again, an alarming increase attributable both to a decline in real per capita income and an increase in income inequality. Still, income inequality was lower in Ukraine than in most other former republics of the Soviet Union."
 http://www.eldis.org/static/DOC3538.htm

One in four Ukrainians is officially poor in a very poor country.
Who suffers the Worse?
"According to the data of ombudsperson Nina Karpacheva, more than 70% of citizens of Ukraine may be related to the poor. This was told by Nina Karpacheva at the round table 'Protecting rights and freedoms of the most vulnerable groups of population'."

"At the same time she quoted official data, according to which 26.7% are poor, among them about 14% -- paupers. N. Karpacheva noticed that there exists the tendency of increasing the number of the handicapped in Ukraine. According to ombudsperson's data, the number of the handicapped grew by 1.5% from 1 January 2000 to 1 January 2001."

"Now this category includes, along with war invalids (274.8 thousand people), 79.5 thousand of victims of the Chernobyl catastrophe, 1,552,800 invalids of common diseases, 104.8 thousand of invalids of labor and professional diseases. The total number of invalids in Ukraine is more than 2.5 million people, nonetheless guaranteeing the right of this group of population still remains unsatisfactory, UNIAN informs".
 http://www.khpg.org/index.php?id=1008253346&r=2&s=2001&n=12

This is what you shout at a revolution: Socialismus! Socialismus! Socialismus!
Don't be a fool and destroy your country for a gangster.
Eto pravda padrug.

To: Red Neck 01.Dec.2004 00:13

zz

Darrrling,

My background is in Slavic and Soviet history. Sorry, I am not Ukrainian, but resent you stereotyping a "Whole Nation". I can see your point that the Ukrainians would be better off with the old Soviet System. Let's not forget about the good old days in the 1930s during the man-made famine in Ukraine (Eastern) where millions upon million of people perished.

After the break -up of the Soviet Union, the "good old boys" retained their power. This is what caused poverty in the 1990s in both Russia and Ukraine. Corruption causing an inequitable distribution of wealth! However, this is not to say that in the good old days equitable distribution of wealth existed. The elites lived pretty well while the workers were exploited as they are today.

There seems to be a sick attitude among some that Ukraine does not deserve to be independent. I find this idea repulsive. We are talking about human beings and human rights. You sound like you side with the Russian and Ukrainian Oligarchs who support both Kuchma and Yanukovich. The current status of the Russian economy is not that great! There are homeless children on the streets of Moscow today. This is not about the Left versus the Right. It is about a right to live in a democratic society.

Spryskov D.S. Persistent Poverty in Russia
 http://www.nes.ru/english/research/abstracts/publ00/Spryskov-e.htm

An analysis of poverty persistence in Russia: 1994-2001.
 http://www.creato.no/espe_2004/sider/pdf/Kalugina2004.pdf

Russia's Homeless Children
 http://www.connors.dircon.co.uk/pages/Stories/homeless.html

At Least 2.5 Million Children in Russia Homeless
 http://www.axcessnews.com/worldnews_102204c.shtml