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Interview with Naomi Klein

"Blockadia" is a term that was first coined in the movement against the Keystone XL Pipeline in Texas. These are the people who are blocking the fossil fuel projects with their bodies and in the courts and in the streets. And we see these choke-points being developed and people are realizing, "If we block the coal ports in Washington State and Oregon, then there's no point..."
to read the interview with Naomi Klein published on September 16, 2014, click on

 link to billmoyers.com

In her new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate, Naomi Klein argues that if we had taken action years ago when scientists first established that human activities were changing our climate, we might have been able to deal with the problem of global warming with only minimal disruption to our economic system. But as we approach a tipping point, and the consequences of climate change come into sharper focus, that time has passed, and we now have to acknowledge that preserving humans' habitat requires a paradigm change.

But Klein doesn't just offer us a depressing litany of the damage we've already done. She calls on us to seriously rethink the way our economy is structured to address not only climate change, but also other longstanding social problems like persistent global poverty and rising inequality...

"Blockadia" is a term that was first coined in the movement against the Keystone XL Pipeline in Texas. These are the people who are blocking the fossil fuel projects with their bodies and in the courts and in the streets. And we see these choke-points being developed and people are realizing, "If we block the coal ports in Washington State and Oregon, then there's no point digging it out in Montana because they're not going to be able to get the coal shipped out to China. So let's pour our energy into stopping those coal ports." And that's what people have been doing. The same is true of the pipeline fights - and not just against the Keystone Pipeline, but the Northern Gateway Pipeline and others as well. And people in Alberta are really panicked because they're landlocked they don't have a way to get their tar sands oil to the sea.

The best moments for me researching the book were just hanging out with people who really love where they live. I have a chapter in the book called Love and Water and I quote an activist named Alexis Bonogofsky in Billings, Montana. She's a rancher and an environmental activist and she talks about taking on the coal companies and she says, "You know, the thing that Arch Coal doesn't understand is that it's not hate and anger that will save this place. Love will save this place." And so often when I was in this transnational space called Blockadia, I felt that this is a genuinely positive movement. It's a movement driven by people falling in love with where they live because they're faced with the prospect of losing something as fundamental as clean water or clean air.

It's really a beautiful movement, and that's counterbalanced this grim work of immersing myself in the scary science. Communities are being transformed through this resistance. And not just by saying no to these projects that they don't want, but also by building real alternatives to those projects and proving to themselves and their neighbors that another economy is both possible and desirable.

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Myths of Capitalism: A Guide for the 99% 25.Sep.2014 16:49

Andrew Torre

Myths of Capitalism: A Guide for the 99% by Andrew Torre

 http://mythsofcapitalism.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/MOCIntro_4.3.14.

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