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The Israel Lobby In The U.S. Investigative Documentary

Episode 1 of 4 The Covert War  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CNspeQYplk
Episode 2 of 4 Managing Elites  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0n_Dke18Co
Episode 3 of 4 The Witch Hunt  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4gh2IRjKwU
Episode 4 of 4 Marketing Occupation  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtcNfD6SwC4


Censored Al Jazeera documentary exposing the Israel lobby in the United States. The documentary was never broadcast by Al Jazeera due to pressure from some Jewish groups and individuals. It was eventually leaked to a few groups, which posted some short clips. On November 2nd 2018 the first two parts finally became available to the public. Then, on November 6th, parts 3 and 4 were finally released.

Undercover reporter Tony Kleinfeld obtained exclusive interviews with persons in the organizations and groups that put forth a pro-Israel message (in U.S. federal and state governments, on college campuses and via mass media), conduct surveillance and intimidation, and obtain financial and political support for the government of Israel from American citizens and politicians.
The Israel Lobby in the U.S. Documentary by Al Jazeera Investigations

Censored Al Jazeera documentary exposing the Israel lobby in the United States. The documentary was never broadcast by Al Jazeera due to pressure from some Jewish groups and individuals. It was eventually leaked to a few groups, which posted some short clips. On November 2nd 2018 the first two parts finally became available to the public. Then, on November 6th, parts 3 and 4 were finally released.

Undercover reporter Tony Kleinfeld obtained exclusive interviews with persons in the organizations and groups that put forth a pro-Israel message (in U.S. federal and state governments, on college campuses and via mass media), conduct surveillance and intimidation, and obtain financial and political support for the government of Israel from American citizens and politicians.


Episode 1 of 4 The Covert War  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6CNspeQYplk
Episode 2 of 4 Managing Elites  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F0n_Dke18Co
Episode 3 of 4 The Witch Hunt  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4gh2IRjKwU
Episode 4 of 4 Marketing Occupation  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtcNfD6SwC4


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"We are a different government working on foreign soil... and we have to be very, very cautious."

"We have three different sub-campaigns. Data gathering, working on activist organisation, money trail. This is something that only a country, with its resources can do the best. We have FDD (Foundation for Defense of Democracies, Washington, D.C.-based pro-Israel think tank). We have others working on this."

Sima Vaknin-Gil,
Director General of Israel's Ministry of Strategic Affairs


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"How do we delegitimise the other side? Kind of through that [social / broadcast / print media] lens of taking over, and making them sound crazy at their game."
"It's mainly gathering intel [on the BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions) movement] and reporting it back to Israel. That's a lot of what I do. To report back to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Strategic Affairs and make sure they have the right information, it's in the Knesset, of what's going on here."
"Pretty much all my friends work at AIPAC. All of them. Whenever we have events at the embassy, and they're like, 'Oh, we should invite AIPAC people'. It's like a joke that obviously I'm going to be the one to write all the emails down. We have to submit names and lists for events. Mine is like 15 names and 14 of them are AIPAC."
"When you're lobbying on behalf of AIPAC, you don't say 'AIPAC'. You say, 'I'm a pro-Israel student from UC Davis'. And when you're meeting with students on campus, I would never say 'I am the AIPAC Campus Rep'. I'd say, 'My name is Julia and I'm a pro-Israel student'. You don't need the title, you don't need the organisation."
"AIPAC attracts the more political students who are more interested in lobbying. We dealt with student elections, very behind the scenes."
"I have several weird Facebooks [accounts]. I have my fake Facebook that I follow all the SJP [Students for Justice in Palestine] accounts. I have some fake names. My name is Jay Bernard or something. So it just sounds like an old white guy, which was the plan. I join all these groups. A lot of people haven't added me. I maybe just wanted to see on the newsfeed what kind of articles they were sharing, just to kind of see what their internal dialogue was."
"I write a report and give it to my boss, who translates it. We don't talk to them on the phone or email. There's a special server that's really secure, that I don't have access to because I'm an American. You have to have [security] clearance to access the server. It's called 'Cables'. It's not even the same in Hebrew, it's like literally 'Cables'. I've seen it, it looks really bizarre. So I write reports that my boss translates into the 'Cables' and sends them. Then they'll send something back and he'll translate it and tell me what I need to do."
"Yeah, I can't say anything negative about Bibi (Israel's Prime Minister) or the government [of Israel] because I definitely work for them. Not directly. I'm just a normal American."

Julia Reifkind,
former UC Davis campus and AIPAC training camp activist and Director of Community Affairs at the Israeli Embassy in Washington, D.C.


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"The Ministry of Strategic Affairs brings together this group called the Global Coalition for Israel, [which consists of] leading pro-Israel advocacy groups around the world."
"My view and the view of Israel's Ministry of Strategic Affairs, which we co-ordinate and communicate with sometimes is that Europe is lost and it's basically over and they're turning a lot of attention now to the U.S. because they feel we're on [a pro-Israel] path."
"Modeled on General Stanley McChrystal's counter-insurgency strategy in Iraq. We've copied a lot from that strategy that has been working really well for us actually. And one of the pieces is this Operations and Intelligence Brief. We're using social media intelligence. A tool called Radian6. We're phasing that out over the next year and we're bringing on more sophisticated technology that is developed in Israel. There's a company called Sensus. It's very pricy though. We had to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars just for it. It's going to increase our discovery rate. We're discovering just about everything we need. It's also going to bring new sources online that we weren't able to access in an automated fashion. Like message boards, and... we have ways to crawl message boards and to monitor them, but it's disconnected from the event and activity discovery mechanism, so we want that system to be all integrated. So we just signed a contract yesterday for them to start that work. They actually already started it. Good friends in Israel that are helping us with that."
"We built up this massive national political campaign to crush them [BDS (Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions) movement]. And to fight back and to fight fire with fire. What we saw was a growing global movement to destroy Israel that was manifesting on American college campuses. It makes sense that they would try to poison our next generation."
"There are about 100, maybe 120 now professionals that are working for a dozen national ICC partner organisations. Like AIPAC and Hasbara Fellowships and StandWithUs and Hillel and Chabad, and AEPi."
[On keeping a clandestine / anonymous profile on campuses] "We should stand behind our work, not in front of it. It's not helpful for StandWithUs to say to a pro-Israel student, or The Israel Project to say to a pro-Israel student, 'Oh sure we'll help you, but you have to put our logo on it'. We're working so closely with StandWithUs and we have such a tight partnership with them today, that it's totally seamless."
"If one of these terrorists on campus wants to disrupt a pro-Israel lecture or something and unfurl a banner or whatever else were going to investigate them and look into bad stuff they've done. That stuff becomes very useful in the moment and there are any number of ways to push it out. The only thing is that we do it securely and anonymously and that's the key."
"With the anti-Israel people, what's most effective, what we've found at least in the last year is you do the opposition research, put up some anonymous website, and then put up targeted Facebook ads. Every few hours you drip out a new piece of the opposition research. It's psychological warfare. It drives them crazy. They either shut down or they spend time responding to it and investigating it which is time they can't spend attacking Israel. So that's incredibly effective."
"But Canary Mission is a good example [of anonymous slandering / intimidation]. Canary Mission is highly, highly effective to the extent that we monitor the Students for Justice in Palestine and their allies. They are terrified of Canary Mission, and it's about time. F**k them, we're doing it back. I mean, not 'we', just some anonymous group [Canary Mission]."

 https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-new-details-revealed-about-the-israeli-money-pipeline-to-canary-mission-1.6554802

"The research operation is very high-tech. When I got here a few years ago the budget was $3,000 (three thousand). Today it's like a million and a half, or more. Probably it's two million ($2,000,000) at this point. I don't even know, it's huge. It's a massive budget."
"We've got major political consulting firms on retainer that are here all the time. We have our own opposition researchers. We have a lot of communications capabilities and what's most interesting about it, I think, is that 90% of the people who pay attention to this space very closely have no idea what we're actually doing, which I like."

Jacob Baime,
Executive Director of the Israel on Campus Coalition (ICC)


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"I represent the [Washington] D.C. schools so I can connect you to Georgetown, GW, American [University]. I think you would really benefit from a conversation with the Israel on Campus Coalition. They also co-ordinate a lot between organisations. So, AIPAC we focus on political. We have one very specific, very effective angle for combatting BDS. But the ICC (Israel on Campus Coalition) pools resources from all the campus organisations. So that they're tapped in on all angles."

Lila Greenberg,
Senior National Field Organiser for AIPAC in the Washington, D.C. area


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"The Israel on Campus Coalition, they really oversee the whole movement. They're also the ones with the bird's-eye view."
"Let's say, next week a BDS resolution comes to campus. So the ICC will be the ones, they'll organise a conference call with all the partners. So they might say, 'Okay StandWithUs, we need a little more of your help because we need something regarding a BDS resolution'. The campus newspaper wants us [ICC] to write an op-ed, can you guys [StandWithUs] help us write the op-ed? So they'll be the ones and they'll be overseeing it."

Ben Brownstein,
StandWithUs employee who was working in the ICC's office


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"The stuff we produced, I felt it was like... bigoted. It would be, pictures of Palestinian kids with a knife. Those videos of kids going to stab people. You would need to put this on [StandWithUs] Facebook and then have me make memes, so there could be graphics about that. It was in everything. It was in presentations on Palestinian terrorism that you give to college students and high school students. And it was on our Facebook pages. I was embarrassed to be associated with it."
[Were they going to universities and using that kind of racist language?] "Yeah. Universities, articles, Facebook, everything."
"At StandWithUs my boss instructed me to refer to BDS as a 'racist hate group' as often as possible, because it polls well. StandWithUs also had a covert group which would slander people as anti-Semites."

Amanda Botfield,
former research associate at The Israel Project (TIP)


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"Getting $38 billion in security aid to Israel matters, which is what AIPAC just did. That's what I'm proud to have been a part of for so long."
"My job was basically to convice students that participating in the war of ideas on campus is actually a distraction. You can hold up signs and have rallies on campus, but the [U.S.] Congress gets $3.1 billion a year for Israel. Everything AIPAC does is focused on influencing Congress."
"Congress is where you have leverage. So you can't influence the President of the United States directly but the Congress can."
"I would say that the foundation that AIPAC sat on is rotting. There used to be actually widespread public support for Israel in the United States. So I don't think that [in future] AIPAC is going to remain as influential as it is. I don't think AIPAC is the tip of the spear anymore, which is worrisome, because who is?"
[speaking about his former job as fundraiser for Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush] "I hope the [United States] Justice Department doesn't make an example out of Bush, because we were operating in a real grey zone. We raised enough money. We figured, 'Let them come at us, we'll defend ourselves'.
[ A relatively small number of 200 influential families spend hundreds of millions of dollars annually to lobby U.S. politicians ] "The 200 families whose giving constitutes 90% of all political giving, are not giving because they want a government contract or because... it's good for their business. They're doing it because they actually care. In my view, it's obscene how much money there is."
"Most of our [The Israel Project] donors are, like, nudniks (bores). Nuk-shlepers (hangers-on). The quality is starting to improve, we're attracting more impressive people. Until recently, the people who we were attracting, you know, was the guy... he's wealthy, gives away $25,000 a year. $10,000 is to us. And this is his hobby or full time job and he won't shut the f**k up or stop calling. We're finally starting to expand into the class of donors that AIPAC has, which is the more elite, easier to work with, smart, strategic, writing-big-cheques kind of money. It takes just as much time to get a $10,000 cheque from someone as it does to get $500,000."

[So the Israeli government leverages Jewish organisations in the Diaspora?] "Yes, absolutely."
[So what are the main media outlets that TIP work with?] "[The] Washington Post is the biggest one. [Isn't it down there? POINTS DOWN STREET IN WASHINGTON D.C.] "Yeah. It's actually that building."
"One of the reasons why Israel is covered disproportionately is the overwhelming majority of journalists covering the Middle East are based in Jerusalem. Jerusalem is a place where you know after a four o'clock deadline you can get drunk at a bar and meet beautiful women."
[The Israel Project has an office in Jerusalem] "We're preparing for the worst case scenario. If it happens. We have to be ready because that war [hypothesized between Israel and Hezbollah] will be won and lost in the court of public opinion. Not on the battlefield. We have an enormous interest in affecting the people who work on the ground there, and that's what they do. They build relationships with people who can give them information, that they can then feed to people who we're building relationships with. So Lior [Weintraub, Director of TIP's Jerusalem office] has a staff of about 20 people. He was Chief of Staff at the Israeli Embassy in [Washington] D.C. for many years. He's a veteran of Israeli politics but he was spokesman for a bunch of government ministries. So he's got real expertise to deal with the press. He's an expert at making their jobs easier so, for instance we actuallly now, when there's a terror attack in Israel, our staff gets to the scene usually before the press does. Just because Lior is so good. They have bullet proof vests on, they have cameras, and as soon as there's... Twitter... an attack, we have like four guys at the scene. He has this rapid response team where he has people strategically placed around the country. So if there's an attack... like the Sarona attack on Sarona Market in Tel Aviv. They take pictures and they get testimonies and by the time the press gets there, we do their jobs for them. They need a quote, they need information, they need... a picture, or a video clip, the full-service shop, we just give it to them. By the time the press got there, we were able to help affect the narrative because... they're all scrambling, they need to get stuff to their editors immediately on what happened, back in Brussels or Washington [D.C.]. We're able to get them information."

[Canary Mission, who is behind and funds it] "There's a guy named Adam Milstein [Chairman of the Israeli-American Council, convicted of tax evasion in 2009] who you might want to meet, he's a convicted felon. That's a bad way to describe him. He's a real-estate mogul. When I was working with him when I was at AIPAC, I was literally emailing back and forth with him while he was in jail. But he's loaded. I mean he's close to half a billion dollars.
"It's him, Adam Milstein's the guy who funds the Canary Mission website. Which is interesting because it makes us [TIP] seem as though we're a part of it. But we're not... I don't know who he hired to oversee it. Actually I was involved in the effort to start it, the name and shame. He called a group of us to ask us what we thought. I told him actually I thought it was a bad idea. But he did it anyway."
"I know a guy actually who's working with Adam on all sorts of digital spying. There's a group of anonymous people who have a very sophisticated digital strategy for exposing these [BDS] people and making sure the stuff stays with them. There's no one on their side doing it so you don't have to worry about your reputation."

[ Adam Milstein's foundation funds numerous pro-Israel organizations (Hasbara, Fuel For Truth, Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD), StandWithUs, ICC, AIPAC, AMCHA Initiative, IAC, The Israel Project) and is a central figure in the American-based Israel lobby. Milstein himself sits on the boards of AIPAC, ICC and StandWithUs. He is also close to Sheldon Adelson, who helped expand Milstein's IAC (Israeli American Council). ]

Eric Gallagher,
former director at the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) from 2010-2015
Development Director at The Israel Project (TIP), 2015-2017


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"I was the chief of staff for my friend who was our student senator. We had StandWithUs write some cheques, but we didn't let them put their logo on it. It was just our names on the logo. We didn't want that association because on Berkeley campus if you don't know, they hate StandWithUs."
"We've used StandWithUs strategically on my campus to have them publish stuff when we wanted stuff publlished. One girl that was running for our student senate, her last name's Din. Sumayyah Din. She ran on the hashtag #DINtifada. As her like...Dintifada. And we're like, 'This isn't okay'. We had StandWithUs attack this girl in an article, released on their Facebook. They shared the screenshots and stuff. 'Intifada is murder. Not a campaign slogan'.
We don't want StandWithUs' name you know, on our name. They have all sorts of followers and some of those people are a little crazy. We have people that are saying, 'That person should die'. This girl [Sumayyah Din] was getting death threats. People were like 'she's a terrorist, blah blah blah'."
[How involved are StandWithUs on campus politics, then?] "They give money. But it's rare that they put their name on something because the leadership that I helped create on that campus is aware that it ruins relationships."

Joshua Cahn,
pro-Israel activist at UC Berkeley and now makes online videos for AIPAC


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"Just this last week, when I was there [in Israel] I met with both (Israeli opposition leader) Herzog and Netanyahu."
"We exist to articulate the reasons that the notion of a Jewish State, is a good thing for us as Americans, and it's a good thing for Jews and a good thing for Israel and a good thing for the West and a good thing for everybody. The lobby can be described as a three-legged stool of political support (influencing U.S. Congress), policy (shaping via think tanks such as FDD), and public discourse (TIP's role via media dissemination). You've got the lobbying and the politics, and you've got the ideas and think tanks. But if you can't define the meaning of those ideas, other people are doing it for you. Then the third leg of the stool isn't there and it falls over."

[Eric Gallagher, speaking about Josh Block] "He's brilliant, in a mad scientist sort of way. He was AIPAC's spokesman. He was the troublemaker, always breaking the rules, always getting s**t done. He's very effective at strategic communications and dealing with journalists. At AIPAC he was the man. He could get anything onto the front page of the Washington Post."

"The most effective thing you can do in Washington [D.C.] is both explain your point of view and explain why other poeple disagree with it. Everyone knows that people come with perspectives. You know, reporters are people... We live in a sophisticated world. But the question is, are you credible?"
"People aren't reading as much, they're not interested in fact, history is a little bit bunk, you know. A lot of people come up now, there's this notion of postmodernism and nothing is true anymore. We are at this interesting moment in time where we need to understand what it is that affects people's understanding and perceptions about what's right and what's wrong and how they work. All these visual stimulus and stuff, how are people learning things? The visual medium is trumping words. More image, more visual, more accessible, non heavy thinking stuff."

Josh Block,
CEO and President of The Israel Project (TIP)

"We don't attack the media. We become a trusted partner and resource, bringing integrity and fact to the coverage."
audio narration excerpt from a The Israel Project (TIP) promotional video


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"We know that people get their news mostly through scanning headlines. So the headlines are very carefully messaged. We don't have any reporters, we just have three people who churn out carefully crafted headlines, with article texts that convinces you that the headline is true."
"There are also things that we do that are completely off the radar. We work together with a lot of other organisations. We produce content that they then publish with their own name on it."

David Hazony,
Editor of Tower Magazine and a managing director of The Israel Project (TIP)

[ White label aka unbranded content provided to other outlets, including vague non-political visual-driven social media pages ]
"We are putting together a lot of pro-Israel media through various social media channels that aren't The Israel Project's channels. So we have a lot of side projects that we are trying to influence the public debate with. That's why it's a secretive thing. Because we don't want people to know that these side projects are associated with The Israel Project. It's because we want to be... people to view them as objectively as possible."
"We have a team of 13 people. We are working on a lot of videos, explainers. A lot of it is just random topics and then maybe 25% of it would be Israel or Jewish based. It's just like, we want to blend in everything."

Jordan Schachtel,
worked with The Israel Project on secretive social media campaigns


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"We made sure that there were [AIPAC activist] people in every single Congressional district. And you'd call them up, and you'd say 'I'm calling from AIPAC in Washington [D.C.]' I did these calls 'We hear that you're good friends with Congressman So-And-So; oh my God, yes, we've been friends since elementary school'. 'Well, what does he think about Israel'? 'I never talked to him about Israel'. 'Well, can I come down and talk to you? And help you figure out a way to talk to him about Israel'? 'No, just tell me: what should I say? I'll just tell him'."
" 'Anti-semitism' [used in broader context of the United States politics] has come to mean 'anti-Israel'. The AIPAC crowd doesn't really care very much about whether or not a person likes Jews or wants one to move next door. All they care about is what their position is on Israel. "

M J Rosenberg,
former editor of AIPAC's policy journal, Near East Report


____________________


"In my job I get to work with every major news network, and I don't even do media. I do academic affairs. Every university president takes our calls, takes our meetings, works with us, because we're a legitimate government organisation."
"There are so many organisations focussed on BDS. For the most part when it comes to BDS, we are very behind the scenes. I'm meeting with university presidents, faculty, students. What they're doing is building relationships with local politicians, making sure the politicians know to turn to them when Israel-sensitive things come to the table."

Jackie Retig,
former Director of Academic Affairs at the Israeli Consulate in New York City


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"We try and go through student government and pass bills. Looking back on it now, it's all bulls**t. It's total crap. Both the BDS in general, obviously. But also it's just... it doesn't do anything. Fighting back against it [pro-Palestinian human rights campus movements] has no practical effect. What has a practical effect is getting [U.S.] Congress to give Israel military aid."
"At the end of the day, it doesn't matter what happens at University X. What matters is what happens here [in Washington D.C.]. What matters is what happens in the capitals of the [U.S.] states, in the capitals of other countries."

Alex Dubin,
employee of the Washington Political Action Committee, a pro-Israel lobby group in Washington D.C.


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"The American-Jewish Committee is running a study tour to either Dubai or Abu Dhabi, and they're talking about mutual co-operation."
[on the ties between UAE and Israel] "They're getting so much better, and nobody knows it. The governments have to coordinate on security. It's all under the table. But on trade, security, tech, medicine, there's a lot of co-operation."
"Basically where I see it standing right now, is the GCC (Gulf Co-operation Council) has all this under-the-table co-operation with Israel, and it's getting to the point where it's getting to the surface."
[Does the UAE have a stake in BDS?] "They do run all the time, the argument of Palestinian suffering and occupation. They do toe that line, but that's because they have to to save face in the Arab League. They're literally just trying to cover their bases. They benefit from Israeli tech. So they're not going to boycott [Israel]. Why would they?"

Max Adelstein,
former intern at the Harbor Group, a PR firm that works on behalf of the United Arab Emirates. He now works at AIPAC.


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"This is the biggest ad-hoc political group and definitely the wealthiest in [Washington] D.C."
[from list of AIPAC fundraising conference attendees provided by Ochs] Mark Kirk (D-IL), senator from Illinois; Ted Deutch (D-FL), congressman from Florida; Barbara Comstock (R-VA), congresswoman from Virginia; Richard Burr (R-NC), senator from North Carolina. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH), she's fantastic. She's on the [United States Senate Armed Services] Arms Committee."
[The fundraiser was being held in a wealthy suburb of Washington D.C.] "They'll walk into the room and say, 'Everything here is off the record'. Then they'll say, 'Here's a little bit about me' and people will ask very specific questions."
"It's the AIPAC group. It makes a difference, it really really does. It's the best bang for your buck and the networking is phenomenal."
"Congressmen and Senators don't do anything unless you pressure them. They kick the can down the road, unless you pressure them. And the only way to do that is with money."
[AIPAC fundraiser was held on behalf of Anthony Brown (D-MD), congressman from Maryland and former lieutenant governor of that state who ran in November 2016] "This is direct spending. Brown's going to use that $30,000 to do ad campaigns. They [AIPAC directors] strategically pick the ones who are in the close races and they want to build relationships with. So we want the Jewish community to go face to face in this small environment; 50, 30, 40 people, and say 'This is what's important to us'. 'We want to make sure, if we give you money that you're going to enforce the Iran deal'. That way, when they need something from him or her, like the Iran deal, they can quickly mobilise and say 'look, we'll give you thirty grand ($30,000)'. They actually impact."
"They're not supposed to advertise [the fundraiser]. There's all these advertising laws. I'm surprised they had an invite [which included suggested donation amounts], I've never seen an actual invite before."
[describing a Wall Street fundraiser event] "In New York with Jeff[rey] Talpins [Wall Street hedge fund manager], we don't ask a goddamn thing about the f**king Palestinians. You know why? Because it's a tiny issue, that's why. It's a small, insignificant issue. The big issue is Iran. We want everything focused on Iran."
"What happens is Jeff [Talpins] meets the congressmen in the back room, tells them exactly what his goals are... and by the way Jeff Talpins is worth $250 million (two hundred and fifty million dollars). Basically they hand him an envelope with 20 (twenty) credit cards and say, 'You can swipe each of these credit cards for $1,000 (a thousand dollars) each."
[What's the name of the group that puts this on?] "It doesn't have a name. There's no name. It's an ad-hoc political group. For all the legal reasons, people pool their money. [To avoid disclosure, multiple credit card 'donations' from separate card accounts are provided to the U.S. legislator] "The one in New York is ten grand ($10,000) over two cycles. It's a minimum commitment. Some people give a lot more than that. Whatever your commitment is, if you give $5,000, Jeff [Talpins] will ensure that we don't... that I don't go over the $2,600. You know what I'm saying?" [<-- Potential violation here of the money laundering laws for individual campaign contributions not being greater than $2,700]

David Ochs,
founder of Ha Lev, an organisation that pays to send young people to the AIPAC conference


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"Right now our current contribution limit from any person to a candidate is $2,700 (two thousand seven hundred dollars). That's a lot of money. And that can certainly buy us some gratitude with the lawmaker. But if you really want to add punch to that type of buying of favors, what you do is you get fifty or a hundred people, together, at an event like this [typical AIPAC fundraising conference held in Washington D.C. or on Wall Street] all chipping in $2,700, and then you bundle it all together and hand over the total amount to the lawmaker. At that point, we're talking anywhere up to a quarter million dollars ($250,000)."
"So suddenly you've got a group of people with the same demands they want from the lawmaker, handing over a quarter million dollars. That buys a lawmaker." [based on the statements made by David Ochs] "Buying these officeholders; that's the point. [AIPAC fundraisers] are chipping in all this money so they can hand over $100,000 or $200,000 to the officeholder so [AIPAC] can buy them."
"There is a disclosure law that is designed to highlight whether there may be potential money laundering going on in events like this. And that is, if the funds are earmarked: and that means the organisation has to disclose who showed up at that event, and how much each individual chipped in, and what they handed over to the lawmaker. Credit card information from individual card accounts (which collectively add up to far greater amounts) remains unreported on campaign finance reports and does not violate earmarking or money laundering laws; only the individual persons who contributed are recorded without any trace of them working together, collectively or as part of a [named or unnamed] 'bundling' group."
"Every year on the summer recess, [AIPAC] fly hundreds of members of [the United States] Congress to Israel for these extended travel junkets that are really lavish; they're first-rate vacations. They'll rack up $20,000 or more for a vacation for a member of Congress. The member can bring along their spouse. And they have a great time."
"A major loophole, essentially engineered by AIPAC, was written in to the 'Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007' circumventing the 1-day free gift travel restriction of that law; the clause is widely known as 'The AIPAC Loophole'. It excluded 'educational trips organised by a charity that did not hire lobbyists'. AIPAC's affiliation with the American Israel Education Foundation (AIEF) was the charity connection used to accomplish this exclusion. AIEF has no office or employees, but is only registered on tax documentation. AIPAC's travel junkets thus remain a very effective influence-peddling tool."

Craig Holman,
campaigns for lobbying reform with Public Citizen


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"We conduct our fundraising in a lawful manner and have no direct or indirect knowledge of the instances you describe."

Congressman Steny Hoyer (D-MD), U.S. Representative for Maryland's 5th congressional district


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"For the Algemeiner, we're trying to recruit someone to go undercover, just to go there [BDS activist meeting] and just see what's going on. I think the person would get paid for it too. We just want someone who is going to sign up, with a low profile and just kind of like see what's going on. The 'higher-ups', they sent me an email today. They're like, 'Do you know anyone who could do this'? For some reason you popped into my head."

Barney Breen-Portnoy,
journalist for the pro-Israel Algemeiner newspaper

[ The Algemeiner, in co-ordination with the far-right funded Canary Mission and Kenneth L. Marcus of the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law, led a targeted campaign against University of Tennessee Knoxville campus pro-Palestine activists to expose what they claimed were anti-Israel speech and actions, and also to influence State of Tennessee and University policy and legislation on anti-Semitism (anti-Israelism). ]

 https://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-new-details-revealed-about-the-israeli-money-pipeline-to-canary-mission-1.6554802


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"The activism has to be very provocative and attention-getting and total no f***s given. We're going to be more pro-Israel than you can even imagine. Just to provoke everyone."
"The majority of Americans are pro-Israel. Whereas you take a poll of Israel in the UK, it's just pure hatred of Israel. Your country [United Kingdom] basically let half of f**ing Pakistan move in. So you have a different problem than we do here."
[His tactic of dealing with pro-Palestinian activism] "You discredit the messenger as a way of discrediting the message."

Noah Pollak,
Executive Director of the Emergency Committee for Israel


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"It is a matter of news judgment and applying AP standards of accuracy and fairness. The idea that the news report would be altered to appease any group is simply untrue."

The Associated Press


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"Neither AIPAC nor TIP nor anyone associated with those organisations has had any influence whatsoever on coverage or editorials in the newspaper. Such allegations are outrageous with absolutely no basis in fact, and it is contemptible that Al Jazeera would disseminate such falsehoods."

The Washington Post


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"Our reporting from Israel and the Palestinian territories is fair and unbiased. With reference to Gaza, we report regularly on life on both sides of the border with Israel. The Israel Project is one of many advocacy groups that exist on both sides of the Israeli-Palestinian divde, and CNN talks to these groups to gain insight into the very different perspectives held."

CNN